Getting back suspend/resume with KDE 5’s powerdevil and no systemd by installing an obsolete version of upower

Using a package out of date since more 2 years ago does not sound like a success story but that is the only way so far I found to get suspend/resume to work without systemd within KDE5 without headaches. pm-suspend and pm-hibernate, on the command line, work perfectly though.

Why? Because Powerdevil, KDE’s power management tool, use upower which itself deprecated pm-utils support in favor of systemd.  So, no matter whether your hardware can actually suspend and hibernate, no matter if the kernel, GNU/Linux itself, can handle, upower won’t.

When calling upower -d, it should output something with can-suspend and can-hibernate. Since they dropped support for pm-utils, it won’t if you don’t use systemd . It’ll behave as if it knew what it was doing except it does not.

I filled a bug report and this one was discarded very fast. Martin Gräßlin immediately marked it as RESOLVED DOWNSTREAM with the comment “This works fine on Debian testing. Please get in contact with your distribution to figure out why this broke in your Debian fork. You might consider of course to install systemd”. You get the idea.  Thanks to Michael Palimaka, I got confirmation that it was tied to upower version (which I guessed beforehand because of several related messages by some Ubuntu or else users – hence the mention “with upower 0.99.3 and Devuan” in my report title) and he listed working solutions: using systemd; using ConsoleKit2; using upower <=0.9.23.

Using systemd to fix a problem caused by an attempt not to use systemd? Not an option. Using ConsoleKit2? Except I have no knowledge of ConsoleKit2 being packaged yet, neither do I know which release of upower actually got ConsoleKit2 support.

So I went for the third option, the lamest obviously, that is installing obsolete, unsupported software, and put in on hold. It can be done as follow:

echo "deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian wheezy main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/oldstable.list
apt-get update
apt-get -t wheezy install libgnutls26 libgcrypt11 libtasn1-3 libusbmuxd1 libimobiledevice2 upower libupower-glib libplist1
echo "upower hold" | dpkg --set-selections

Then a call to upower -d gives:

Daemon:
 daemon-version: 0.9.17
 can-suspend: no
 can-hibernate no
 on-battery: no
 on-low-battery: no
 lid-is-closed: no
 lid-is-present: no
 is-docked: no

It is better but still no good. As root it’ll work, though. You need to add some PolicyKit rule to allow regular users to use it. The following assumes that powerdev group exists and that your regular users are in this group (if they are not, add them with adduser thisuser powerdev):

echo "[Suspend power group override]
Identity=unix-group:powerdev
Action=org.freedesktop.upower.suspend
ResultAny=yes
ResultInactive=yes
ResultActive=yes

[Hibernate power group override]
Identity=unix-group:powerdev
Action=org.freedesktop.upower.hibernate
ResultAny=yes
ResultInactive=yes
ResultActive=yes" > /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/power-group.suspend-override.pkla

Now, if done properly, upower -d returns:

Daemon:
 daemon-version: 0.9.17
 can-suspend: yes
 can-hibernate yes
 on-battery: no
 on-low-battery: no
 lid-is-closed: no
 lid-is-present: no
 is-docked: no

Logout and login should be enough to have back suspend and hibernate within KDE5.

So this works. For now. But there is no doubt, this is wrong in so many ways. I wonder for how long it will be possible to run a modern desktop environment on GNU/Linux, and not on systemd/whatever.

 

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Using a laptop as alarm clock

My alarm clock died long ago. Since then, I use my cellphone to wake me up. Works ok, except that my current cellphone is total crap and, among numerous issues, its alarm software some morning just stays idle while, the others days when it actually works, a simple movement shuts it off. Believe me, I checked everything, made plenty of test, it’s just bad design and poorly coded software.

Not to mention that I usually wake up with no alarm; so when I use one, it means that I must wake up early, probably with not enough sleep at all. I need the real deal, high sound level and no shortcut to kill it, to actually get up.

Whenever I needed an alarm, I ended up running, on my laptop not to far from my bed, some `sleep XXh XXm && mplayer /path/to/a/song`, check sound volume, followed by CTRL-C in the morning.

Two days ago, I was über-tired, I needed to wake up early next morning and calculating tomorrow waking up time  – current time just pissed me off, not to mention checking the volume level, mute setting and such. It pissed me enough to decide me to write a script to fix the problem. Here comes wakey.pl:

  • it takes as argument the time you’d like to wake up in the form HH:MM or HHh MMm ;
  • it can run as timer (as sleep), useful if you want to take 20min nap, with -t or –timer ;
  • it wakes you up playing a random song picked in ~/.wakey ;
  • it uses mplayer to play the song, so it can be in any format your mplayer supports ;
  • it raises progressively the sound volume when trying to wake you up (you can set –volume-max, in case 100% on Master mixer is too loud) and reset properly mixer settings when finished ;
  • it won’t stop playing the music until you type a 3 to 5 characters word randomly taken from the defaut dictionary installed on your system (/usr/share/dict/words).

I wanted it to deal with any powersave setup to make sure to forbid the laptop to sleep or hibernate, but I found not portable and clean way to do it (my laptop uses KDE with PowerDevil). I’d be happy to hear about any clue/lead in the regard.

# (this assume wakey.pl is executable and in $PATH)
# wakes you up next time its 6 in the morning:
wakey.pl 06:00

# the same
wakey.pl 6h

# wakes you up exactly in 15 minutes
wakey.pl -t  :15

# the same
wakey.l 15m --timer

# the same but make sure the sound volume wont exceed 70%
wakey.l 15m -t -v 70

To run it, make sure you have debian packages libfile-homedir-perl and libterm-readkey-perl installed. You’ll also need mplayer and amixer properly set up.